Glenda Mae's Daylily Farm

Beautiful for a Day!

Daylilies are one of the most intriguing flowers. They come in an array of shapes, colors, and patterns. The daylily is a hardy perennial that has it's bloom buds on a stem or scape. Each scape will have multiple buds, which open into a bloom. Each bloom lasts for one day hence the name daylily. Each plant will bloom over several weeks. Re-blooms will have two blooming cycles. 


How to Plant Daylilies

Daylilies should be planted in well drained soil. Work in compost, peat moss, or pine bark mulch with the soil before planting. Did a hole larger than the rhizome. Build a mound and spread the roots over the mound like a saddle. Cover the roots with soil to the same level as planted before. 

Daylilies need at least six hours of sun each day, but appreciate late afternoon shade in south. Daylilies perform well in filtered shade. 


Caring for Daylilies

Daylilies need at least one inch of water weekly during blooming season to perform their best. 

​Daylilies perform best in a PH soil of 6.5-6.8. Fertilize daylilies with a balanced fertilize such as 8-8-8. Fertilize should be applied just as dormant cultivars begin to emerge, usually late February in East Texas. Apply pine bark mulch yearly to improve the soil and maintain weed control.

Fall is the best time divide daylilies if overcrowding occurs. However, you can divide daylilies in early spring. At the farm, we will do divisions until late February, Use a knife to cut the rhizomes if necessary. Divide daylilies into no less than a 2-3 fan division.


Pests

In early spring, daylilies are notorious for aphids, a white soft body insect. The aphids leave a sticky substance on the leaves. Aphids can cause damage to daylilies in severe cases. An easy remedy is to mix up a solution of dishwashing soap and water at a ratio of 4 oz. of soap per 1 gallon of water. There are also many effective insecticidal sprays available at your local nursery or garden center.